You say copyright infringement, I say innovation.

“The photographer is to the painter as the sampler is to the instrumentalist.” Bold statement, bold and various interpretations. Is this analogy feasible? Is this a negative thing? Positive? Some may see this as defamation of talent towards the painter and instrumentalist, others see it as innovation. Key question: if photography and sampling were never discovered, how would each field grow? Would there be other ways of painting and playing music discovered? It is hard to tell where there is a line that is being crossed or is crossable. Let’s face it, now photography and sampling are just as much as an art as their counterparts, should they not be viewed as such?  That’s the question people could ask themselves, but I’d guess many don’t.  I rarely heard about these issues until it came up in class, but again, without sampling, without photography, without innovation, where would the passions and talents of those people lie? 

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Government=spys, Google=saviors.

After  thinking about Google as a business and seeing all of the different things the company does, it is mind-boggling how one organization can do it all. Google  Street View is especially peculiar in the operation. Can you imagine driving around in a compact on every single street while the car snaps millions of photographs? I can’t. The question at hand is, how would we react if it was the government and not a private company such as Google? The answer in short is, people would have a conniption. From my observations and studying how people feel about the government (Polisci major, woof.), it seems pretty clear that many people  have a skeptical, if not fully distrusting view of the government. So, it’s safe to say that if someone saw one of those little cars with a giant hunk of camera attached to the top, and it had a government symbol or organization logo on it, people would go crazy and maybe get a little paranoid. I can hear the complaints now being called into news stations, radio stations, news papers, tweets, blogs, Facebook statuses, you name it, it’d be complained on. “The government is spying on us,” “They’re watching our every move,” “My neighbor must be a terrorist,” “Aliens are coming to destroy us.” Maybe not the last one, but you get my point. Private organizations don’t get that reaction, especially Google. Google is “the man” of the modern web. Everyone knows what it is and generally how to use it, so something like Street View is seen as a lifesaving program for directionally impaired people. Very interesting.